38-41 Granby Knitting Series by Amy Lane

Winter Courtship Rituals of Fur-Bearing Critters

This is the only series that I have found that incorporates a wool mill into the books in a meaningful way. Given that, it is a gay romance with some touching and heartbreaking scenes. This book is not m/m to the exclusion or derision of other types of couples, if anything the orientation is just taken as fact and treated as any other couple. That is not to say that this book does not include any graphic sex, they all seem to.
This is the start of a decent series, if you don’t mind M/M romance. The characters are a little odd, but I love that it is set in a wool mill with very accurate (to my knowledge) explanations of the processes involved.

How to Raise an Honest Rabbit

This is the only series that I have found that incorporates a wool mill into the books in a meaningful way. Given that, it is a gay romance with some touching and heartbreaking scenes. This book is not m/m to the exclusion or derision of other types of couples, if anything the orientation is just taken as fact and treated as any other couple. That is not to say that this book does not include any graphic sex, they all seem to.
This is a good story about a man who emotionally beats himself up, but really is a good man after all. As the characters grow up, physically in some cases and emotionally in others, you can’t help but like them a little more. It really is a short book, but there is quite a bit of emotional development.

Knitter in His Natural Habitat

This is the only series that I have found that incorporates a wool mill into the books in a meaningful way. Given that, it is a gay romance with some touching and heartbreaking scenes. This book is not m/m to the exclusion or derision of other types of couples, if anything the orientation is just taken as fact and treated as any other couple. That is not to say that this book does not include any graphic sex, they all seem to.
This is a story of a gay playboy that happens to run a knitting store for a lovely woman who decides that he is tired of his club hopping ways. He takes up knitting, he loved the colors but never thought of knitting before, and finds himself. Then things begin to heat up! This was a pretty good read, there are certainly some heart-breaking scenes in there but the overall book was good.

Blackbird Knitting in a Bunnies Layer

This is the only series that I have found that incorporates a wool mill into the books in a meaningful way. Given that, it is a gay romance with some touching and heartbreaking scenes. This book is not m/m to the exclusion or derision of other types of couples, if anything the orientation is just taken as fact and treated as any other couple. That is not to say that this book does not include any graphic sex, they all seem to.
This book in particular is a poignant look at two characters that became a couple in the second book in the series. They are very sweet characters and I enjoyed reading about them as they grew as people. There are some elements of one of the other characters pregnancy, she is female, and some other background drama that can be heart wrenching. This was a decent read, and I really enjoyed the Fiber Arts aspect of the book!

Happy Reading!

29/100 Yarnitecture by Jillian Moreno

Okay, when I say I read this, I do admit I did not read every word of every glossary and index found in the back. There were several really neat knitting patterns in this book. I enjoyed reading the tips, the graphics were wonderful, I have a much better grasp of how to spin fine after reading this book. I also have a much better understanding of what I am looking for in a knitting yarn and why yarn is spun in a particular manner. I think that if you are a dedicated knitter hoping to get into spinning this is certainly a book for you. If you are a spinner that wants to spin knitting yarn then read this book and watch the video ‘Spinning for Lace’ they both have great tips.
If you are a spinner that spins for fun and knitting is a very far back burner hobby, then this is not the book for you.
All in all an interesting read!

69/100 Spin Art: Mastering the Craft of Spinning Textured Yarn by Jacey Boggs

This is a really good book for the beginner, or advanced I suppose, spinner that is a little afraid of spinning art yarn. Right now I am definitely in the beginner category but with this book showing me what my ‘mistakes’ are called and how to create them, I also have an idea of how to correct them or create them on purpose. If you are intermediate or advanced this is a great resource for spinning all of those cool, funky, yarns you see floating around and selling for a fortune. Although, after seeing how they are made step by step, I understand why the cost a fortune now. While I cannot wait to learn how to spin yarn consistently each time, I now feel free to enjoy the journey toward that goal. (and create some really cool yarn along the way!)

63/100 Respect the Spindle by Abby Franquemont

If you have ever had the nerve to think of the drop spindle as a simple tool, or that you knew what you were doing on the drop spindle then read this book.  You will lose all of your silly illusions of competence.  Really, I love this book.  It did take quite a bit for me to get through all of it, but I have always had that problem with non-fiction books.  There is an amazing wealth of information, from different types of spindles, different ways of spinning, various methods of increasing your spinning production (for me that ruins the calm aspects of spinning) and so much more.  Interspersed with the advice, descriptions, and methods, are tidbits of the history of spinning and recommendations for different books that can be read about this craft that you have decided to take up.  If you are a very beginning spinner and you feel better knowing everything there is about a craft before picking this up, then this is a good book.  If you get scared off of a craft if it looks too hard and it will take you a few years to get the courage back to try the craft; then don’t read this book.  One of the main points I received from this book (other than how many kinds of spinning I have yet to try) is that drop spindling is as complicated or as simple as you want it to be.  Some basic techniques such as knowing if you are spinning woolen, worsted, or a combination, can help you drop the spindle less, but practice is the most important thing.

Spin-Off Magazine

Okay, technically these are not books and do not count toward my reading goal.  That being said, I am still reading.  Recently I have read Spin-Off Magazine, Fall 2014 and Spring 2013.  Both issues had a great deal of information to impart about spinning, weaving, fiber and threads.  I have really enjoyed reading these two and look forward to reading the articles in the other five I have waiting for me.  I started looking through them but got hung up on articles I want to read in depth but did not have time for yet.  Do not fear, I have another two books on spinning as well as two books on weaving  I hope to read soon as well.  Yay, fibercrafts!

52/100 Start Spinning by Maggie Casey

If you are thinking about spinning, interested in fiber arts, or just want to know where yarn comes from then this is a good book!  It does get technical in places, but if you want to start spinning some technicalities come in handy.  I really enjoyed this, the author spoke of her own experiences as well as things that she does differently.  While she looks at all aspects, there are places where her bias toward methods is obvious but ignorable.  The glossaries and resources pages are great, it is good to have a definition when she starts talking about rolag and batts, she does define them in the text but something else to look at is nice too.  The illustrations of each step are wonderful, it might as well be a ‘how to’ video in spots.